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About the Work

This work consists of a number of large paired panels. Each panel was covered by a photo enlargement of a photocopy of a photograph. As a result, they looked rather like charcoal drawings. The paired panels showed photographs of myself, dressed in an hotel bed sheet doubling as a Roman toga, posing in front of, on one panel, Roman style government buildings in Washington DC, and on its pair, the same style buildings, but the real thing, crumbling in the deserts of North Africa. I adopted mirror image poses in each case. I stood in the toga outside the White House, the Washington Monument, the National Archives Building (where I was asked not to photograph without written permission from the Senate for the use of a tripod), the Supreme Court (where I was threatened with arrest), the Jefferson Memorial, the Lincoln Memorial and the United States Capitol.
There were no interruptions in North Africa, except from a man with a camel who insisted on being included in the photograph outside the huge Roman amphitheatre standing in the desert at El Djem. I was happy to oblige, and he was juxtaposed with people watching me outside the US Capitol.
The photographs were taken in 1973, at the same time as Watergate and the continuing war in Vietnam.

About Vaughan Grylls

Born 10th December 1943 in Newark, Nottinghamshire and attended art schools at Nottingham, Wolverhampton, Goldsmiths' and the Slade. He has taught at several art schools in the UK and the US.

From 1996 to 2005 he was Director of the Kent Institute of Art and Design. In 2005 he resigned to concentrate full-time on his own work after joining the Kent and the Surrey Institutes of Art and Design to make the University for the Creative Arts.

″I still use the same approach to my work: I get an idea, think of the title and then make the work. So not much has changed since 1964″

Copyright ©2018 belongs to Vaughan Grylls
Design: www.renebach.dk